'Clubs Groups & Organizations' Category


This Friday, 25 candidates will be manifestation of the Carnival in Puerto Penasco

Friday, February 25th, 2011

 

On Friday 25 February, the first major event held as part of the celebrations of Carnival 2011 Puerto Peñasco “Times of Magic and Splendor” and at the end of the election will be held of the Queen and Rey Feo, said Jose Ramon Campos.El Town Clerk said that the tour will start at City Hall ending on the Plaza at La Madre where fortunately the Court shall be elected to head the traditional carnival celebrations. “This Friday we will have demonstration in each of the candidates and candidates Queens Ugly King, at the end we will have the choice by lot, so I invite the entire community to join us, to join this great party, “he said.” The parade “he added,” is scheduled to begin at 6 pm and leave the palace to go all the Benito Juarez Boulevard and end at the Plaza to the mother, will be a party atmosphere, with joy, with music and surprises “. The queen candidates are: Marleth Coronado Mercado, Reyes Haro Itzajana Andrea, Laura Villasana and Adriana Garcia Yhormey Hayward Real while Rey Feo are: Ivan Ramirez and Rosario Chi Guillermo García Estrella Israel. Children also participate Yahira Janeth Reyes Luna Magaña Ceseña yJaime addition reported that the development of floats carrying van in good time so far to 80% complete some of them found in the painting stage and acabado.Hizo a call for people interested in participating with floats and parades Citizen attend to register and thus have a greater order in the parades, and reiterated the invitation to attend this Friday to see the manifestation of candidates which will elect the Reina y Rey Feo to be crowned at the start of Carnival

Self-Employment Fair held in Rocky Point

Wednesday, February 9th, 2011

Self-Employment Fair held in Rocky Point last week of February was held in Puerto Peñasco’s first Self-Employment Fair as part of efforts to improve the employment situation in the city, said the Mayor Alejandro Zepeda Munro.Al concluding a meeting with Assistant Secretary of Labor of Employment and Productivity, Juan Edmundo López Durán, the mayor emphasized that there are various supports that will be offering as a way to improve the employment issue in the municipality. “We are making efforts to address matters related with the working environment in the city, so our call today attended the Secretary of Labor and have reached important agreements, and so we will continue to operate with the appropriate bodies, “he said.”We define the realization of Self-Employment Fair “added “as well as admission to the National Employment System, through which we will be working a job and be in the office of Planning and Development which provides the service. ” He said the meeting discussed issues related to support programs that can be applied to benefit the working plan of the city as is “Bécate whereby you can provide scholarships and support to workers.”We are aware of the situation prevailing in the city, so we are working on different fronts to achieve support, as granted to entrepreneurs for entrepreneurs, and we likewise promotion Peñasco, explicó.Confió that by working together all the different levels of government and private initiative are to realize support and breakthroughs that will benefit the entire community.

CEDO (Intercultural Center for the Study of Deserts and Oceans) is proud to announce the declaration of Bahía San Jorge’s wetlands as Wetlands of International Importance

Saturday, October 2nd, 2010

As part of the celebration of World Wetlands Day on February 2nd, the Secretary of Environment and Natural Resources (SEMARNAT), Juan Rafael Elvira Quesada, announced the addition of the wetlands at Bahía San Jorge as one of seven new sites in the List of Wetlands of International Importance of the Ramsar Convention in 2010.

During the memorial ceremony on the island of San Pedro, in Yuriria, Guanajuato, the Secretary said that with this designation Mexico is now second in the world, behind only the United Kingdom, in the number of Ramsar sites it currently has. One hundred and thirty one sites exist and cover a total surface of eight million, 915 thousand, 433.7 hectares. The Convention on Wetlands, signed in Ramsar, Iran in 1971, is an intergovernmental treaty, which provides the framework for national action and international cooperation on the conservation and wise use of wetlands and their resources. Mexico joined the Convention on November 4, 1986.

The wetlands of Bahía San Jorge extend over more than 35 linear kilometers of coastline, from the northern tip of Estero Almejas to the southern tip of Estero San Francisquito. This Ramsar site brings together a combination of habitats, marshes, low intertidal mud, salt marshes, coastal dunes, sandy beaches, permanent shallow marine waters and wetland-terrestrial interface, connecting the earth system with one of the most productive marine systems world, the Gulf of California, and are in turn connected to the Sonoran Desert.

Currently, this area is of great importance for fisheries and aquaculture production, and for species, such as rays, guitarfish, shark, octopus, shrimp, and crab. Like other estuaries in the region, Bahía San Jorge’s wetlands serve as nesting, resting and feeding grounds for migratory and resident birds that are part of the Pacific Flyway, including species like the least tern, the American oystercatcher and savanna sparrow. The canals and marshes of the site serve as refuge and feeding areas for the larval and juvenile stages of fish and invertebrates, and as well as for feeding grounds for marine species. Bahía San Jorge also hosts a resident population of the bottlenose dolphin, an endangered species. There are also endemic species not found anywhere else in the world there, like the fisherman myotis bat.

The declaration of the Bahía San Jorge’s wetlands as Wetlands of International Importance increases support for conservation and sustainable use, which helps protect its ecological integrity, and continues to maintain important ecological functions and environmental services.

Source: CedoIntercultural. Gob

Puerto Penasco City Admin weekly open meetings

Wednesday, January 13th, 2010



PUERTO PENASCO / ROCKY POINT CITY ADMINISTRATION
would like to invite you ….

EVERY WEDNESDAY OF THE MONTH FROM 10 AM TO 2 PM

The  Alejandro Zepeda administration, including the Police Chief, Zoning, Finance,  FD, etc. all of whom speak English and Spanish

WHERE? On the door steps of City Hall – located at the corner of Freemont and Benito Juarez 

WHY? To hear your suggestions, take care of problems and answer your questions and if you have any kind of complaint to take immediate action.



THERE NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY THEY ARE THERE WAITING FOR YOU


PUERTO PENASCO CITY GOVERNMENT works, governs and protects everyone regardless of country of origin, language, race, political affiliation, sexual preference, visitor or permanent resident…We govern for all with equal opportunity and open doors!

IN PUERTO PENASCO WE TAKE CARE OF TOURISTS, RESIDENTS AND CITIZENS

The CEDO Nature Center in Las Conchas, Rocky Point, Mexico

Tuesday, June 2nd, 2009

The CEDO Nature Center in Las Conchas, Rocky Point, Mexico

 

Cedo – Center for the Study of Deserts and Oceans (at Rocky point / Puerto Penasco) where you can find a whale Skelton.

CEDO have received an award recognizing their group as the top non-governmental organization working for nature conservation in all of Mexico.

CEDO also provides lots of tourist activities which are helpful for your child to gain knowledge on nature.

The main program they are providing is eco adventure in which:

• Visits of Botanical Gardens, nearby coastal desert
• Guided tours of the craters in El Pinacate National Park
• Hiking tour of the Gran Desierto Dunes – the largest sand sea in North America
• Guided Visit excursions to of a coastal wetland
• Tidepool explorations
• Natural History Talk
• Guided kayaking on estuaries

More activities  Eco Adventure



Explore the ecologically distinct area of the Northern Gulf of California in these natural history excursions of the desert & sea designed especially for you and your family. All activities start at the CEDO Environmental Science Center in Puerto Peñasco, Sonora.

Make your reservations now by phone or fax at: (MEX) 011-52-638-3820113 & 3820115

From the US: 520-829-4501 or (U.S.) 520-320-5473
or by e-mail at:
info@cedointercultural.org

 

 

 Eco-Adventures
For full description of the eco adventures scroll down

 

Download the 2008 schedule of activities (PDF file)

 

Eco Adventures Calendar 2008

Month

Date

Day

Time

Activity

January

19

Saturday

3- 6 pm

Estero Excursion

February

2

Saturday


 

Wetlands Day

February

2

Saturday

7-10 am

Wetland Bird Walk

February

10

Sunday

8 am – 2 pm

Pinacate Perigrination

February

23

Saturday

8:30-10:30 am

Tidepool Explorations

March

8

Saturday

11 am – 4 pm

Las Conchas Home Tour

March

9

Sunday

8-10 am

Tidepool Explorations

March

15

Saturday

9 am – 3 pm

Destination Dunes

March

22

Saturday


 

World Water Day

March

22

Saturday

8 – 10 am

Estero Excursion

April

5

Saturday

11 am – 4 pm

Kayak Capers

April

19

Saturday

7 – 10 am

Tidepool Explorations

April

22

Tuesday


 

Earth Day

May

3

Saturday

7 – 10 am

Estero Excursion

May

9

Friday


 

Migratory Birds Day

May

25

Sunday

7 – 2 pm

Isla San Jorge Sojourn

June

5

Thursday


 

World Environmental Day

June

9

Monday


 

Oceans Day

June

7

Saturday

9:30 am – 12 pm

Tidepool Explorations

June

19-23

Thurs-Mon


 

Wet-Feet Ocean Camp

July

5

Saturday

2 – 7 pm

Sunset Kayak Capers

July

14-18

Mon-Fri


 

Campamento Pies Mojados

July

27-31

Sun-Thurs


 

Campamento Pies Mojados

August

23

Saturday

7 am – 2 pm

Isla San Jorge Sojourn

August

30

Saturday

7 – 9 am

Tidepool Explorations

September

13

Saturday

4 – 7 pm

Sunset Estero Excursion

September

27

Saturday

6 – 8 pm

Tidepool Explorations

October

4

Saturday

7 – 2 pm

Isla San Jorge Sojourn

October

25

Saturday

7 – 10 am

Estero Excursion

November

22

Saturday

9 – 3 pm

Destination Dunes

November

29

Saturday

8 am – 2 pm

Pinacate Perigrination

December

13

Saturday

7:30 – 10:30 am

Wetland Bird Walk

 

Desert Discovery•Cost: $10, kids under 5 free

Enjoy a tranquil walk through CEDO’s Botanical Gardens & nearby coastal desert. Learn about desert ora, fauna & indigenous uses of plants. Perfect for families.

 

Destination Dunes•Cost: $40, lunch included

Expert guides lead this hiking tour of the spectacular Gran Desierto dunes, the largest sand sea in North America. Approx. 5 hours, lunch included. Participants will caravan in their own vehicles. Find out more about the Destination Dunes trip here. 

 

Estero Excursion•Cost: $20 adults, $10 kids under 12

Experience the beauty of a coastal wetland lled with crabs, oysters, birds and more! Prepare to get your hands and feet dirty! Fun for people of all ages. Approx. 3-4 hours. Find out more about the Estero Excursion here.

 

International Peñasco Coastal Cleanup•No Cost 

Assist neighboring community organizations and schools clean up our beaches and estuaries. Partnering organizations include CEDO, OOMISLIM, Comisión de Fomento de Turismo del Estado de Sonora and the Ocean Conservancy. Great for families and groups of all sizes. Contact CEDO for more information.

 

Isla San Jorge Sojourn•Cost: $100 non-members, discount for members, lunch included

Take this boat tour of Isla San Jorge (Bird Island) with CEDO experts! This eco-adventure includes an introductory slideshow & talk on Gulf island ecology & CEDO research. All day, lunch included. Find out more about the Isla San Jorge Sojourn here. (PDF)

 

Kayak Caper•Cost: $75 members, $85 non-members, age 18 & up only, lunch included

Experience the inspiring wildlife and terrain of Estero Morúa at eye level with the animals. Each tour includes expert guides, local ecology talk, full-day kayak rental, lunch & beverages. Approx. 6 hours.

 

Natural History Talks•Cost: free

A CEDO tradition! Afternoon Natural History Talks will give you background about the local ecology and help answer many of your questions about the area. Every Tuesday and Saturday afternoon. Select times for English and Spanish tours.

 

Pinacate Peregrination•Cost: $65, lunch included

Explore the lava ows, craters, and other geologic wonders of the Pinacate Biosphere Reserve with CEDO experts. All day, lunch included. Participants will caravan in their own vehicles. Find out more about the Pinacate Peregrination here.

 

Tidepool Tour•Cost: $15 adults, $10 kids under 12

Secrets of the tidepools are revealed by CEDO naturalists during this excursion to the rocky intertidal zone. Discover the unique world of brittle stars, crabs, chitons and all of their invertabrate companions! A fun hands-on experience! Approx. 2 hours.

 

Wetland Bird Walk•Cost: $10

Join CEDO’s birdwatchers for an exploration of the avian life of Estero Morua. A rich habitat for Sandpipers, Plovers, Terns, Gulls, Grebes, Curlews, Dowitchers & more! Bring binoculars and bird guides if you have them.


To all these ecotours you should bring: water, snacks, hat, sunscreen, binoculars, camera. On the Kayak Capers, Estero Excursion and Tidepool Explorations you can count on getting your feet wet – at the very least. So wear shoes and clothes that you don’t mind getting wet. For the Dunes and Pinacate trips, good walking shoes are in order. The Dunes trip involves a long but not strenuous walk. The Pinacate trip requires more driving but in both excursions there will be ample time to explore on foot these spectacular natural settings.

 

 

 

Puerto Peñasco Magazines

Tuesday, June 2nd, 2009

Puerto Peñasco Magazines

 

Sometimes we all need to be reminded to put things in perspective. It happens all the time, something may seem earth shattering in the moment it is occurring and when we have the ability to  stop and look back we think well…maybe we over reacted. Perhaps that’s what is happening right now when it comes to Mexico travel and tourism.  

Puerto Penasco Mexico is a beautiful destination 60 miles south of the Arizona border. A quiet little beach town with a population over 50,000(see Wikipedia info) it has had little violent crime and offers beachside relaxation and fishing on the beautiful Sea of Cortez.


It is not close to Mexico City. The capital of Mexico has a population exceeding 22 million people, making it the largest metropolitan area in the western hemisphere and the second largest in the world by population according to the United Nations and other organizations.

In fact Puerto Penasco is only 215 miles from Phoenix, Arizona the 5th largest city in the United States. Phoenix is 1,998 miles from Washington DC the capital of the United States and Puerto Penasco is less than 2000 miles from the capital Mexico City. This quiet little seaport town is no closer to the capital of their state capital than Phoenix is to Washington D.C.

Think about it if something happens in Washington DC with violence or murders or swine flu, do we close the borders of the United States? It is our capital, just like Mexico City is Mexico’s capital. When the sniper attacks occurred in the DC suburban area did we close the United States down and send warnings not to visit the US? Certainly no one would have thought to announce any warnings about Phoenix with issues happening in DC? Do other countries close their borders from the US and cancel their trips to all of the United States when something concerning happens in our capital?

Or let us use a smaller more comparable town to Puerto Penasco, Mexico. For this example, how about Show Low, Arizona, a beautiful mountain town with some of the largest Ponderosa Pines in the world and great skiing. Definitely smaller population then Puerto Penasco but a unique tourist destination similar to Rocky Point. So, if we hear about something happening in Show Low will we avoid the entire US or Arizona? For that matter will we cancel our trips to Show Low? Of course not, that sounds ridiculous. Well, then why are we cancelling our beach vacations to Mexico?

In March 2009, a shoot out occurred in the Wal-Mart parking lot in Show Low, Arizona ( see article on murders) . The murders happened right around spring break time and Show Low, Arizona with its rugged high elevation and beautiful mountains is a Spring Break skiing destination…why didn’t universities issue warning about going to Show Low?

Because sometimes bad things happen no matter where you are at in the world.  People get the flu, a horrific shoot out happens at a Wal Mart in a small town, and someone shoots a man on the freeway in Phoenix. Horrible bad things happen in small and large towns every day. Do we stop traveling and stay at home? Of course not. Let’s get some reality.

Perhaps, before you cancel your trips to Mexico, you should understand where you are going and what happens in your own neighborhood and put things in perspective. Think about the 36,000 cases of flu last year in the United States.

As of today, unlike Phoenix, Arizona, there has not been one report of H1N1 previously known as swine flu in the town of Puerto Penasco or the state of Sonora.

What does this mean to you?
 
Plan a weekend road trip to Rocky Point. Go to a laid back place where you can have lunch with the sound of the waves and sit on a blanket under clear skies with millions of stars. Go have some fun in the sun without any smog and clear air.

Go jet skiing, parasailing, swimming, beachcombing, have some margaritas and eat a few yummy tacos. Just returning from a long weekend in Puerto Penasco, the weather was fantastic and the water is at a perfect temperature. The business owners are waiting for you ready to ensure you have a great vacation and hoping tourism picks up, I guarantee you will get spectacular ser

INTERCULTURAL CENTER FOR STUDY OF OCEANS AND DESERTS CEDO, A.C.

Saturday, March 28th, 2009

“CEDO receives award from the State Tourism Office Comisión de Fomento al Turismo and from the  Center for Sustainable Destination´s of the National Geographic Society.”

 

The intercultural Center for Study of Oceans and Deserts, A.C. received this award on the 13th of January, for being selected as a Geotourism Destination as stated by the international National Geographic Society Magazine. The award, signed by the Comisionado de Turismo, Epifanio Salido, and by the director of the “Centro de Destinos Sustentables” (Center for Sustainable Destinations) Jonathan B.Tourtellot, consisted of a beautiful plaque commemorating the inclusion of CEDO in the guide-map for Geotourism in the Sonoran Desert.

 

Geotourism is a new concept, still unknown to many, consisting of responsible tourism that places value on an area in which ideas such as nature, culture, history and social well being are respected and realized by the communities there.

 

CEDO, together with diverse community groups, created the eco touristic corridos NaturArte and it´s own educational and ecotouristic activities, to help promote and realize geotouristic activities in the area. Another memer of NaturArte, the Ejido Luis Encinas Johnson, located in the Ciénega de Santa Clara, has also been named by the naciotal Geographic Society as a geotouristic destination.

 

For CEDO, the value of Puerto Peñasco, the near zones and it´s nature, people abd culture are veryclear. CEDO seeks to continue driving the touristic development of the region based on these  values and seeks to improve the quality of life of the residents and the health of the regions eco systems.

 

To learn more about CEDO and its ecotourism initiatives please visit: The NaturArte Ecotouristic Corridor website al www.cedonaturarte.org and the CEDO website on www.cedointercultural.org

Tucson women field guide to Sea of Cortez tidepool

Thursday, December 11th, 2008

By BONNIE HENRY   Arizona Daily Star
They started with a pie plate and a bucket. Later, they graduated to a net.

From those humble beginnings, Betty Hupp and Marilyn Malone — pals for decades, neither one a scientist — have come up with “The Edge of the Sea of Cortez,” a gorgeously photographed guide to what lives in the tidepools of the Upper Gulf of California.

“It’s setting new standards for guides. It is amazing,” says Don Thomson, professor emeritus of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Arizona.

“Most of the field guides around are more scientific, with relatively few pictures,” says Peggy Boyer, executive director of CEDO, the Spanish acronym for the Intercultural Center for the Study of Deserts and Oceans in Rocky Point Mexico. A small Mexican fishing villiage.

Indeed it is — with 1,026 color photographs of everything from sponges to sea urchins, scallops to sea anemones, jellyfish to fiddler crabs.

“We wanted something for families,” says Hupp, who along with Malone will do a book-signing Dec. 13 at Tohono Chul Park.

In fact, it was family — more specifically, their kids — who planted the seed decades ago.

“We were on the beach years ago at Puerto Penasco,” says Malone, 71. “The kids would come up with something they’d found on the beach and say, ‘What’s this?’ ”

“And we’d say, ‘We don’t know,’ ” says Hupp, 79. “We couldn’t find anything to answer the kids’ questions.”

Settled into the same Midtown neighborhood in Tucson, the two met years ago on a field trip to the downtown library.

Hupp, the mother of six, was married to a pilot stationed at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base.

Malone, mother of two, was married to Carl Hodges, one of the founders of CEDO and one-time head of the UA’s Environmental Research Lab, which studied desalinization and prompted shrimp farming in Mexico.

She often accompanied her husband on his trips to the Sea of Cortez.

In 1981, she and Hodges divorced, and Malone, who’s since remarried, became a detective with the Tucson Police Department, investigating child abuse and neglect cases, including homicides.

Meanwhile, Hupp had also retired as an executive assistant at the UA. With more time to spare, the two women ratcheted up their friendship. In 2004, they attended a three-day tidepool institute at Puerto Penasco, also known as Rocky Point, put on by CEDO.

“There were marine biology interns there. They camped out. We got a motel room,” says Malone. They also delved into research, picking up books here and there but finding few photos in them other than in black and white.

Meanwhile, field research on the beach often entailed rising before dawn for low tide.

“We started with a small camera, a bucket and a glass pie plate to capture the animals and take photos from the undersides,” says Malone.

Every spring from 2004 through 2007 the two women picked out and photographed tidepool creatures on the beaches of Puerto Penasco and Cholla Bay.

“We would get queries from Mexicans and American tourists, but we never had any problems,” says Hupp. “We were just a couple of little old ladies.”

After the first trip, they shifted from film to digital images, taking 10,000 photographs in all.

They also took classes in how to best present those images in layout and design.

One of the hardest tasks was deciding what to leave out, what to leave in.

There were also environmental concerns.

“We tell people to be careful and put the rocks back where they found them,” says Hupp.

Adds Malone: “This is not a preachy, environmental book.”

Thomson, who along with other scientists helped edit the book, says none of the creatures highlighted in the book is endangered.

As the book took shape, editors in the scientific community gave them constant feedback. “We wanted to make it as accurate as possible,” adds Malone.

Self-published, the book is now being distributed by University of Arizona Press and is also available through CEDO.

“We learned a lot,” says Malone, who along with Hupp is hoping their book is translated into Spanish. They’re also thinking of doing another book, possibly on the Southern Gulf of California or even Hawaii.

Whatever they do, the agreement they entered into before this book still holds.

“We made a pact that family and friendship came first,” Hupp says.

“And we are still friends,” Malone says.

___

Information from: Arizona Daily Star, http://www.azstarnet.com

Biologist Alejandro Castillo, Sub Director of CEDO given national award

Saturday, December 6th, 2008

Biologist  Alejandro Castillo,  Sub Director of CEDO,  Given National Award
Alejandro Castillo Lopez, Sub Director of the Intercultural Center of Desert and Ocean Studies (CEDO), was recently granted the National Youth Award, presented by Mexico President Felipe Calderon. The award is presented each year to young leader whose contributions to Mexican society are truly noteworthy.
Together with 19 other young men and women, Castillo received a monetary award, a gold medal and a diploma signed and presented by the President of Mexico in the city’s capital.
Through a CEDO press release it was reported that although clearly this is a tremendous honor for Alejandro Castillo, he says he would have happily traded in the award for the guarantee that the laws of Mexico are abided by, offering true protection of the country’s natural resources.
“Alejandro is dedicated to the protection of the environment and believes that this is the only way to help the country resolve problems associated with the extreme poverty that affects so many people throughout Mexico,” states the release.
The statement stresses that Alejandro’s interest in the environment began at a very early age and has always been evident. He studied biology at the University of the America in Puebla, where he obtained a scholarship given his exceptional work.
After graduating in 2005, he moved to Puerto Peñasco, Sonora, to work at CEDO as coordinator of programs of coastal conservation and sustainable development. Currently, he is the Sub Director of CEDO.
The principal objective of Alejandro’s work at CEDO has been the conversation of the estuaries in the region. As one of the most productive ecosystems in the world, the estuaries are being threatened by coastal development along the shores of the Gulf of California.
In 2006 Alejandro created an eco-tourism route known as NaturArte, a project that has allowed CEDO to support development and connect the eco-tourism market with community businesses located by the estuaries.
The NaturArte tours provide visitors the possibility to enjoy areas of tremendous natural beauty while at the same time supporting environmentally friendly local businesses. The project also provides funds for the protection of these key habitats.
In 2007 Alejandro won an award from the University of the Valley of Mexico for the NaturArte Project, as being one of the best programs of social development led by young Mexican men and women.
During recent years, Alejandro has been part of CEDO and has become a leader in the conservation of Mexico contributing not only to the preservation of wetlands, but also to key marine environments. Alejandro Castillo does not hesitate in continuing to contribute in an important way to the conservation of the richness of the natural resources of Mexico.

Values promoted in neighborhoods: 400 promoters appointed

Wednesday, November 19th, 2008

Values Promoted In Neighborhoods: 400 Promoters Appointed 

 

In order to promote values and good customs in local neighborhoods, and throughout the entire society, appointments were made of 400 promoters of values, of a total of 1,500 that will be trained this year. 

 

The positions were made with the backing of the Human Development program, which during recent weeks had been active through the office of Municipal Social Development in the neighborhoods of Puerto Peñasco, under the motto: “enjoying the present with values preserves my future”. 

 

Guadalupe Jaime Blanco, Mirna Lopez Vanegas, Ana Rocio Chavez, Rosario Rios Lara, Patricia Bojorquez, Rosa del Carmen Lara and Elizama Duran were the first to be named promoters of values of the 400 that participated in the first stage of the program. 

 

Raul Mendez Rojas, Director of Social Development, stated the stragety is to promote values and good customs and involved 20 meetings held in diverse points of the city. He commented that this first stage of appointing promoters of values required a tremendous effort and work on behalf of staff from his office. Mendez Rojas stated that the goal is to appoint more than 1,500 promoters of values this year. He noted this will be done through direct contact with people in neighborhoods around the city. 

 

Mrs. Patricia Bojorquez, speaking on behalf of the promoters of values, gave thank for the interest of the municipal government in building human values within the society. She stated that the talks have served quite a bit in getting closer to people from each of the city’s neighborhoods and strengthening human relationships an dliving peacefully. 

 

As part of the Human Development program, the more than 150 attendees of the event enjoyed a theatric presentation concerning the theme of values put on by participants of the strategy to promote values among those of the Peñasco community.